Global Power Coffee Hour: The Opioid Crisis

Canada and the U.S. are currently gripped in an epidemic of opiate and prescription drug abuse. Meet five Canadian medical professionals as we discuss North America’s addiction crisis.

This event is free to attend, but we encourage you register here.

Canada | Combating the Opioid Epidemic

February 18–21


Five Canadian doctors and medical workers will be meeting with local politicians, NGOs, and medical community to discuss the current outbreak of opioid abuse.

WAC board member and veteran signs letter in defense of diplomacy

This week more than 1,200 veterans signed an open letter opposing cuts to diplomacy and foreign aid in the federal budget. Among the veteran signatories is World Affairs Council board member Brian Easley, who in the past has also served as our Visitor Programs Manager. The letter outlines the essential nature of diplomacy in preserving national security and America’s position as a global leader.

The full text of the letter is below, and the full list of signatories can be found here.


The Honorable Paul Ryan
Speaker of the House
U.S. House of Representatives

The Honorable Nancy Pelosi
Minority Leader
U.S. House of Representatives

The Honorable Mitch McConnell
Majority Leader
U.S. Senate

The Honorable Chuck Schumer
Minority Leader
U.S. Senate

Dear Speaker Ryan, Minority Leader Pelosi, Majority Leader McConnell, and Minority Leader Schumer,

We write as veterans of all branches of America’s Armed Forces to share how our service in uniform has convinced us that diplomacy and development are critical tools alongside the military to keep America safe. We believe that with today’s escalating global crises, America must strengthen, not weaken, our leadership around the world.

As members of the military, many of us served on the frontlines alongside America’s diplomats and development professionals. We saw firsthand how our civilian forces must continue to be part and parcel of a comprehensive national security strategy. With the recent military progress against ISIS, we know that strategic investments in the State Department and USAID will be essential if we are to solidify our hard-fought gains and prevent other bad actors from filling the void.

As Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis testified, “America has two fundamental powers, the power of intimidation…America’s awesome determination to defend herself, and the power of inspiration which is heavily conveyed overseas by our Department of State.” Yet America’s critical civilian international affairs programs saw proposals that would have drawn down our presence around the world. As you and your colleagues look ahead to the federal budget for Fiscal Year 2019, we hope you will support strong resources for America’s global leadership.

Thank you for your commitment to America’s safety, security, and prosperity. We ask you to stay vigilant and ensure that our country makes the commitments necessary to prevent conflict so that we only send our brothers and sisters in uniform into harm’s way as a last resort.

Thank you for your consideration.

Multiregional | Corporate Social Responsibility

February 13–17


Five business people from Brazil, Egypt, Pakistan, Palestine, and Saudi Arabia. They will be meeting with businesses and NGOs to discuss sustainability, social impact, and civil rights.

A home hospitality host for this group has been selected. If you are interested in hosting a group of visitors for dinner in your home, please contact Visitor Programs Manager Laura Duncan, [email protected].

Ukraine | Empowering Women to Lead

February 10–14


Five women from Ukraine who will be meeting with local politicians and NGOs to discuss the barriers women face in running for public offices and how to overcome them.

Multiregional | Education in the Digital Age

February 7–11


Seven teachers, government officials, and NGO workers from Bahrain, Greece, India, Japan, Maldives, Slovenia, Tunisia. They will be meeting with local schools and nonprofits to examine the ways developing technologies are impacting student learning.

Manual wins local Academic WorldQuest

This Saturday we hosted our local Academic WorldQuest at the Main library on York Street. Over the weekend  nine Kentuckiana schools participated in hopes of winning, to move forward to the national level in Washington D.C. AWQ gives opportunities to high school students to learn geography, world history, and world affairs. It is a national competition that approximately 4,000 students across the country participate in.

The competition was intense as students participated in rounds of questions pertaining to current topics: America’s diplomats, Saudi Arabia, and much more!  It was a close competition but Manual High school was able beat out their opponents to win 1st and 2nd place, with Brown coming in 3rd. We will be cheering on Manual as they continue on to the national level in the spring to compete in Washington D.C. It was awesome to see such a great turnout with so many local high schools competing. It was a great day filled with fun, friendly competition, and great prizes! We are already looking forward to Academic WorldQuest 2018.

A huge thanks to DD Williamson, The Color House for sponsoring their trip, The Louisville Free Public Library for providing a space, and to Heine Brothers Coffee, Carmichael’s Bookstore and Dairy Queen for their donations.

 

 

Celebrate Afro-Cuban Culture

Come celebrate Afro-Cuban culture with a lecture, music, dance, and a performance by the SYacademy Cuba at the Iroquois Library.

 

Global Hotspots of 2018: What’s Coming and How Will America Respond?

REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT

 

About this Event:

A new year has begun, and in our rapidly evolving world that means a whole new host of global challenges are just around the corner. What are the possible places, conflicts, and upheavals Americans should be on the lookout for in the coming year? What global trends should we expect? What countries will likely be undergoing the biggest social or political alterations? What will be next year’s biggest world players? And what will all of this mean for Americans at home?

Join us as Stewart Patrick sets a global forecast for 2018, what’s coming and how America will respond to it. Copies of his most recent book, The Sovereignty Warswill be available for purchase and signings at the event.

5:30 Reception
6:00 Program
7:30 Dinner

Stewart Patrick  is the director of the International Institutions and Global Governance Program at the Council on Foreign Relations. His areas of expertise include multilateral cooperation on global issues; U.S. policy toward international institutions, including the United Nations; and the challenges posed by fragile and post–conflict states. From September 2002 to January 2005, Dr. Patrick served on the secretary of state’s policy planning staff, with lead staff responsibility for U.S. policy toward Afghanistan and a range of global and transnational issues, including refugees and migration, international law enforcement, and global health affairs. He is the author, coauthor, or editor of five books.

This program produced in partnership with the World Affairs Councils of America.

Cost:

Free, Members
$10, Students
$20, Public

+$30 for post-event dinner. The deadline to purchase dinner tickets is January 23.

Thanks to a generous donation by the William E. Barth Foundation, we are now able to provide a limited number of complimentary tickets for students who wish to attend our World at Home speaker series. To enter our lottery for a free ticket, please complete this form.

REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT

Interview with Vitoria Marques of Brazil Youth Ambassadors

by Karina Cabral
Original article printed in Portuguese at O Livre.
Photo Credits: O Livre.


An example in her community, Mato Grosso student wins exchange in the United States

Fifty students from Brazilian public schools were chosen by the US embassy in Brazil, among 23,000 applicants, to gain an exchange in the United States. Among them is Vitoria Lissa de Oliveira Marques, 18, a Mato Grossan from São José do Rio Claro (296 km from Cuiabá), an example in her community for her leadership and volunteerism.

The program that Vitória is participating in is called Young Ambassadors and was created in 2002. A success since 2010, it has been reproduced in all the countries of the Americas. Since the program began, 522 Brazilians have participated.

Vitoria always volunteered—at school, in the church, teaching English to children in a public school—but it was in 2016 that she signed up for the program for the first time.

“My mother had a fundamental role, because she was the one who made my pre-registration, without even telling me. I remember that, as the stages went by, I became more and more surprised and I reached the final, but I was not selected,” said the young woman.

In the first attempt, as a finalist she was given the opportunity to participate in another embassy program, the EIP (English Immersion USA Program), which takes the finalists of the Young Ambassadors to a week in Brasília, where they undergo a total immersion in American culture.

“We participate in lectures and classes on culture / history and other things in the United States, in partnership with Thomas Jefferson House. This gave me an incredible view of the United States and of Brazil itself, because it contains people from all over the country,” said Victoria.

Last year, Vitória tried again and went through the entire selection process, which includes a pre-registration, sending documents to prove the written application, and a written and an oral test.

The entire process is done by a partner institution, which in Mato Grosso is the State Secretary of Education (Seduc). In the end, four finalists per state are selected—and one of them gets the chance to go to the Young Ambassadors and the other three go to the EIP.

The program is for students aged 15 to 18, who are in high school, have a good command of the Portuguese language, do some kind of volunteer work and have never been to the United States. That is, this was the last year for Victoria, who is 18 and finished high school in 2017.

Fluent English is not a requirement, but it is necessary to be at a good level of the language in order to communicate in that country. Victoria never took lessons, she learned English alone.

She is currently awaiting the outcome of the Enem, as she intends to attend medicine. In the meantime, she will spend three weeks in the United States with the Young Ambassadors, attending leadership workshops, volunteer projects, meeting government officials and US community leaders and giving presentations on Brazil.

“I’m going to stay in Washington for a few days, and then I’ll be staying at an American family’s home in Louisville, Kentucky,” she said.

With the trip coming—she goes on Friday—the young woman said that her anxiety was “at a thousand”, especially regarding meeting the family that will host her. She believes that this experience will transform her future, giving her the opportunity to broaden her worldview and improve her English.

“It’s the realization of a dream, a result of commitment. I just have to be thankful,” she said.